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Census 2011: Identity, Language and Religion in Scotland, 19/03/14 [S]

The statistics published by the Registrar General for Scotland on the Scotland’s Census website present further details from the 2011 Census in Scotland on Ethnicity, Identity, Language and Religion, from national to local level.

Among the key points are:

  • The proportion of Scotland’s population who felt they had some Scottish identity either on its own or in combination with another identity was highest for people born in Scotland, at 94 per cent. This proportion was 26 per cent for those born in England, 16 per cent for those born in Northern Ireland and 21 per cent for those born in Wales.
  • Of the population who were born in Scotland, 9 per cent were aged 18 to 24, generally speaking the student age population. This proportion was similar for people born in England (10 per cent) and Wales (8 per cent) but was slightly higher for those born in Northern Ireland (15 per cent). It was also generally higher for people born outside the UK, ranging up to 33 per cent for those born in eastern Asia and 36 per cent for those born in central Asia.
  • Of the population who were born in Scotland, 37 per cent stated they belonged to the Church of Scotland, 16 per cent stated they were Roman Catholic and 37 per cent stated they had “No religion”. The ‘Other Christian’ and ‘Muslim’ groups accounted for 3.2 per cent and 0.6 per cent respectively of the Scottish-born population.
  • The great majority (89 per cent) of the population born outside the UK arrived in the UK aged under 35; this pattern was generally reflected across all ethnic groups.
  • While just over a third (35 per cent) of the population who were born outside the UK arrived into the UK aged 16 to 24, this proportion was 47 per cent for those born in the Republic of Ireland and 49 per cent for those born in in eastern Asia.
  • The proportion of the population aged 3 and over reported as not being able to speak English well or at all was 1.4 per cent overall and 11 per cent for those born outside the UK. This proportion generally increased with age of arrival into the UK: for those who arrived aged under 16 it was 5 per cent while for those who arrived aged 65 and over it was 31 per cent.

For full details see the Scottish Government website.


Further Information

Census 2011: Identity, Language and Religion in Scotland

Scottish Government news release